This article tells you about the reconquista.online web-site, what is already here and what is planned for the future.

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  • Maps and diagrams of the various journeys of the characters. You can find a map of Al Andalus on the Maps & Charts page. There is also a map of Jerez city, which is also at the front of the book. A chart of the voyage of the Hebe on her way to the near east, and of the Teresa, will follow.
  • Questions & Answers with the author, especiallypuzzle-431568_1280 from questions asked at Readers Afternoon of Clapham Literary Festival and other events. If you have any questions send them in using the comments boxes and I will endeavour to answer them.
  • Articles on the history of the city and the area around it, which has a rich and intriguing past. The Maps  Charts page leads you to a Brief History of Jerez before the Christian Era.
  • Pieces on studying the history of the period, especially as there has been a recent, and controversial, re-interpretation of the primary sources. Did King Alfonso really enter, victorious, into Jerez on 9th October, 1264, as has been believed for centuries? It seems that this may not have happened as everyone thought it did.
  • Articles about the origin and development of the book, including ‘out-takes’ and sections of the stories which didn’t make it into the final version. What is the story behind ‘Reconquista‘ the book?
  • A Gallery. There are photographs of Jerez city today, showing those parts of the town which survive from the thirteenth century and which visitors can still find. In addition, some of the original illustrations intended for an earlier version of the book, but not included in the final version.
  • Artefacts belonging to the characters, such as Rebecca’s diary entries, 20151016_172105Nathan’s star charts and the Captain’s log from the Teresa.
  • Articles on daily life in 13th century Al Andalus. What did people eat?  How did they travel? What were their daily lives like?  There is already a blog post about going, or not going, to school in 13th century Jerez. See it here.
  • Tasters from the follow up book, currently entitled ‘Convivencia‘ ( which means ‘Living Together’ in Spanish ).

JerezEaster20142And reconquista.online would like to hear from you, the readers of ‘Reconquista‘, about what you think of the story, who your favourite characters are and what you think is going to happen next. We plan to provide chat and discussion spaces.

Would you like to try your hand at writing?  There will be competitions, with the winning entries published on reconquista.online.  Perhaps from the point of view of other characters who appear in ‘Reconquista‘ or its follow-up ‘Convivencia‘?  Or describing how would you have reacted if you were in some of the tough situations experienced by our heroes?  Watch out for the competition announcements.

Until there is more to see on reconquista.online you might like to look at these articles on The Story Bazaar website                    Visualising ‘Reconquista             Reading a book by its cover….                The Wrong Saint